Why Students Should Turn the Internet Off When They Study

By Stefanie Weisman

[Editor’s note: This article was originally posted on the Freedom website and has been re-posted with their permission.]

Okay, I admit it.  I’ve been having a little problem in the self-control department lately.  No matter what I tried to do – write an article, do research, read a book, etc. – I found myself typing the url of some distracting, time-wasting website, with Facebook being the worst offender.  It was a rather bizarre feeling, as if my fingers had acquired a mind of their own.  Before I knew it, I had been sucked into an internet black hole of silly videos and mindless trivia, which used up a good chunk of my time and energy.

My situation is hardly unique.  In my experience as a high school and college study skills expert, I’m constantly reminded of the problems caused by excessive internet usage.  On average, teens spend nine hours a day using media for entertainment – that’s more time than they spend sleeping and far more time than they spend studying.  Many students use social media and other “fun” sites while they’re studying or doing homework.  They may think such media multi-tasking doesn’t hurt their concentration, but study after study has shown this not to be the case.  According to a pioneer in this field, the late Stanford professor Clifford Nass, “people who chronically multitask show an enormous range of deficits. They’re basically terrible at all sorts of cognitive tasks, including multitasking.”  In a 2012 study, researchers found that using Facebook and texting in particular were associated with lower GPA.

But as we all know, it can be hard to give up things that are bad for us.  The instant gratification we feel from sending a Tweet or getting a Like on our Facebook post creates a dopamine loop in our brains that makes us hungry for more.  We can all use a little help in the fight against bad habits.  Which is why, when I was given the chance to try Freedom, a program designed to eliminate distractions on the web, I jumped at the opportunity.

After downloading Freedom, the first thing I did was set up a recurring block of Facebook and other sites I have a weakness for, such as YouTube and Netflix, during the work day.  I was struck by how freeing it was to know these sites were off-limits.  My need to check on my friends seemed to evaporate, and my productivity increased.  At times when I needed complete concentration, I chose to block all websites – easily done on Freedom by checking a box.

freedom_full_view_cropped

A view of what the Freedom dashboard looks like on my computer.

I quickly discovered that Freedom has many features that make it superior to, say, disabling the wi-fi on your computer.  While shutting down wi-fi is an all-or-nothing solution, Freedom helps you fine-tune your internet consumption.  You can create multiple Blocklists, allowing you to block as many or as few websites as you want with the click of a button.  Freedom conveniently lets you choose from a list of the most commonly used (or should I say abused) social media sites, and you can manually enter any other sites you find distracting.  You can put these Blocklists into effect at any time or schedule them for recurring Sessions, which is great if you know you want to avoid certain sites at the same time every day, and sync your Sessions across multiple devices.  Perhaps most importantly, Freedom can keep you from giving in to temptation.  The problem with disabling your wi-fi is that you can easily turn it back on again.  With Freedom, you can select Locked Mode, which makes it virtually impossible to access the internet (or specific sites) for up to 8 hours.

This software would clearly be a great tool for students.  Those who use their PCs to take notes could set up a recurring block of all websites during class time, thus avoiding the distractions associated with in-class laptop use.  Similar blocks could be set up when studying for exams or writing papers.  And when students need the internet to do research, they can block social sites that would keep them from their work.

I used Freedom on a Windows PC and an iPhone.  Here are a few tricks I learned on how to use Freedom most effectively on these devices:

  • When I had a Session going in Locked Mode, I realized I was still able to end the Session by selecting “Quit” on the Freedom desktop icon. To fully enable Locked Mode, go to Options on the desktop icon and select “Disable Quit During Sessions.”  Developers will be syncing this to Locked Mode to eliminate confusion.
  • Having multiple Sessions going at the same time may cause unintended consequences. At one point, I had to restart my computer to regain access to the internet after a Session had ended.  To avoid this, select “Sync Freedom” on the desktop icon.
  • You may still be able to access the Facebook app on your mobile device during Sessions that are supposed to block the site. Developers are working on a way to block the app, but in the meantime, use this work-around.

I’m especially looking forward to the time when Freedom has a whitelisting feature, which developers are hard at work on.  This means that users will be able to block all websites except the ones they specify.  I would love to be able to access my email and a few other sites while blocking the rest of the internet.

I’ll leave you with one last thought, which in my view is pretty amazing: I haven’t checked Facebook once while writing this article.


Want more study tips?  Check out The Secrets of Top Students.

Expert Stefanie Weisman: How to Study Without Distraction

Thanks to Freedom for posting my article about their internet-blocking software, which is great for students and non-students alike. I’ve re-posted the article below.

Freedom Matters

screen-shot-2015-12-17-at-5-19-19-pmOkay, I admit it. I’ve been having a little problem in the self-control department lately. No matter what I tried to do – write an article, do research, read a book, etc. – I found myself typing the url of some distracting, time-wasting website, with Facebook being the worst offender. It was a rather bizarre feeling, as if my fingers had acquired a mind of their own.  Before I knew it, I had been sucked into an internet black hole of silly videos and mindless trivia, which used up a good chunk of my time and energy.

My situation is hardly unique.  In my experience as a high school and college study skills expert, I’m constantly reminded of the problems caused by excessive internet usage.  On average, teens spend nine hours a day using media for entertainment – that’s more time than they spend sleeping and far more time than…

View original post 902 more words

Should You Get Your MBA? 5 Things to Consider

By Jim Raychrudhury

If you speak with a lot of business professionals, many of them will tell you the same thing: they have their MBA. “MBA” stands for Master of Business Administration and it’s a valuable degree to pursue if you’re in the professional world. Not only does an MBA make your resume stand out, but it also shows how determined you are to succeed.

The MBA will prepare you to take a leadership role in a business setting. (Click here to find out even more about getting the most from your MBA.) Here are just five reasons why you should seriously consider getting an MBA.

pensive businessman

Considering a career in business? (Photo by SalFalko via Flickr)

  1. Salary

Your MBA will give you important insight into your career, which means that you’re more valuable to employers. According to Masters Portal, the Association of MBAs has found that graduates who showcase their MBA on their resume earn upwards of 80,000 GBP, or over $100,000, per year. Overall, people with an MBA tend to earn more than people who hold only undergraduate degrees, according to the Kazian School of Management

  1. Career Opportunities

Employers love to hire graduates who have an MBA. This automatically increases the job opportunities that are waiting for you once you’re finished with school. If you have high-reaching business goals, an MBA will help you get there. In addition to landing a great job fresh out of school, you’ll also have more promotion opportunities. Employers feel that their employees who have MBAs are extremely valuable to the company. Masters Portal states that employers like hiring recent MBA graduates because they have new, up-to-date business acumen. Additionally, having employees who hold MBAs raises the prestige of a company. When it’s time to fill a higher position, they’ll look within the company – this is when your MBA will shine.

  1. Networking

Throughout your MBA program, there will be numerous opportunities to network and make connections. You should take as many of those opportunities as possible. You’ll be able to interact with other students and business professionals both online and in person. Plus, once you graduate, you’ll be able to stay connected to the alumni network for years to come. Never underestimate the importance of new contacts. Even if you don’t feel they’d benefit you today, you never know when a contact will be able to help you in the future.

  1. Skills and Knowledge

While an MBA will help you land a job with a high salary, there are even more perks to pursing this type of education. You’ll gain a host of new, transferable skills to take with you after you graduate. As stated in this Forbes article, MBA students learn about public speaking and presenting in front of groups; how to manage teams of people; and about the global economy. Not only will those skills help you out in your career, but they’ll even be beneficial to you in your daily life. Everything that you learn about critical thinking, effective communication and leadership can be used in both business and life.

  1. New Perspective

When you spend time getting your MBA instead of working in the field, you may feel that you’re not getting important first-hand experience. However, reflecting on business issues in an educational setting will give you a unique perspective on the business industry. Not only will you have the time and guidance to think through major business issues with your professors, but you’ll also learn from experienced executives who speak at your school. You’ll be able to bounce ideas off of other people who have the same interests as you. When your two years of school is over, you’ll have so much more knowledge and insight to take back with you to the office.

Once you dive head first into the business world, you’ll learn numerous valuable lessons. However, many of those lessons can be learned ahead of time in business school. An MBA will make you the most prepared you can be to head into the professional world, either for the first time or in an effort to advance your career. Also keep in mind that if you’re not in a position to completely forgo your full-time job, there are ways to fit in an MBA education while continuing to work.

About the author: Jim Raychrudhury is a freelance writer and passionate blogger who likes writing articles that cover career, education and business related topics. He has written numerous articles and contributed to several other blogs. When he is not writing, he enjoys spending time outdoors with his family.

Do Sweaty Students Make Better Students? The Connection Between Exercise and Better Grades

By Mathew Jade

It’s no secret that college students have jam-packed schedules. There are classes to attend, assignments to submit and socialization to be done. It’s hard enough to find time to sleep, let alone squeeze in regular exercise. You may ask why it’s important – there will be plenty of time to get fit once college is over, right?  However, what I was taught during my MBA, and what has long been taught in all top-notch business schools, is now being backed by scientific evidence: Regular exercise does not just keep you physically fit but also provides important cognitive benefits that can help you perform better in class – or in pretty much any setting where you need to use your brain cells.

Healthy Lifestyle Seamless Pattern

So how exactly does exercise help? Let me elaborate

  • Exercise acts as a stimulant for brain cell development

For more than a decade, neuroscientists and physiologists have been gathering evidence on how exercise affects brainpower. Recent experiments have proved that there is a definite relationship between exercise and improved cognitive abilities.

For example, the New York Times published the results of a study led by Justin. S. Rhodes, a psychology professor in the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois. His study involved running experiments on four groups of mice. The mice who were given exercise wheels had marked improvements in brainpower. Mice exercising had more neurons – that is, brain cells – than those which did not.  In addition, the mice exercising regularly had developed more complex connections between neurons, meaning they could think faster.  Substitute a treadmill for a hamster wheel, and there’s a good chance you’ll see better grades over time.

  • Exercise will help you be more focused

A Canadian school that caters to learning-disabled and ADHD children carried out an experiment in 2009, in which children exercised for 20 minutes on treadmills or exercise bikes before starting math lessons. Teachers noted a marked improvement in students’ concentration levels, information retaining capabilities, and their overall motivation to study.

  • Exercise relieves stress

We all know college is a stressful time. It’s a challenge to get enough sleep, and there’s tons of work to do. Exercise, even if it is 15 minutes a day (high intensity, enough to jack up your heart rate and breath) leads to the release of endorphins. Endorphins are feel-good chemicals that keep stress at bay. So exercise can reduce stress and help you work your way through college more effectively.

Exercise is very important in college. Not only will it keep your brain sharp, but it will also help you stay physically fit. It’s common for students to suffer from the “Freshman 15” – that is, the 15 pounds freshmen pack on in the first year due to limited exercise and unhealthy diet. And following an exercise regime is something you should do for life. For example, Hong Kong business magnate Allan Zeman does 90 minutes of exercise every morning without fail; Zeman once made a U.S. president wait so he could complete his daily exercise routine.

About the author: Mathew Jade is a passionate blogger who loves to write on Economics and finance-related topics. For further updates follow @Mathew_Jade


Looking for more mind-brain study tips?  Check out The Secrets of Top Students, available at Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

Save Astoria’s Cultural Heritage

I know this is off-topic, but I’m including a post from my other blog because we need all the help we can get! Thanks for reading.

Glimpses of Paradise

Rite Aid

I’m very upset that a lovely and historic piece of architecture in my hometown of Astoria, NY, is under threat of destruction.  This terra cotta decoration on 36th St. and Broadway features Neptune and other symbols of the sea, as many decades ago it used to be a Childs Restaurant.

rite aid2

Later it became a Rite Aid, and now it’s a Deals store.  According to the Greater Astoria Historical Society, they’re planning on destroying this whimsical work.  Astoria has been undergoing massive gentrification lately, but that’s no reason to destroy one of the few architectural gems we have.  Please see the Historical Society’s Facebook page for more information.  Apparently they’re trying to give it landmark status, but it’s a difficult process.  They recommend contacting Council Member Costa Constantinides‘ office.  Please help get the word out to protect Astoria’s (and NYC’s) historic and unique architecture!

Addendum

Please consider sending the following…

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The Importance of Friendship in High School and College

By Sarah Lockwood

Sarah Lockwood is a concerned parent and former social worker. Having worked with the public for decades and after watching her own daughter struggle with addiction, Sarah knows all too well the devastation that can be caused by drug and alcohol abuse. Sarah’s daughter is now in recovery, but her experiences with substance abuse inspired Sarah to get involved with ThePreventionCoalition.org. She plans to spread awareness and support through her work for others dealing with addiction. While Sarah devotes a lot of time to the Coalition, she makes sure to relax and enjoy the small things in life, as every day is a gift.

We all know growing up is not easy. Thankfully, the close connections built in high school and college help young adults survive the hard times and can even shape their personalities and lifestyles through adulthood. Part of the reason adolescents become so close to friends during those years is because they aren’t quite as guarded as people tend to be later in life. The tight bonds created with friends serve as powerful forces that impact choices, behavior, and attitudes. They can also provide valuable support systems for the tumultuous teenage years. Sometimes these friendships may even last a lifetime.

teens and connections

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Home Alone: Pros and Cons of Homeschooling

By Susanne Loxton

There are many different reasons why modern parents consider homeschooling. Some do it for religious reasons, while others may do it because of lifestyle reasons and flexibility. Still others decide to homeschool because they’re dissatisfied with their local public schools, and private schools are not an option. No matter the cause, if you’re thinking about diving into the world of homeschooling your children, you need to remember that it’s not all fun and games. Here are some things to keep in mind when deciding whether or not to homeschool your child.

homeschooling

Should you homeschool your child? (Photo by Rachel via Flickr)

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